Data Set Citation:
When using this data, please cite the data package:
NCEAS 12360: Williams: Evaluating life history theory and the consequences of reproductive strategy for population fluctuations , National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis , and Williams J. 2011.
Demographic data of Cynoglussum officinale at 3 sites in the native and introduced ranges from 2004 - 2007
nceas.976.1 (https://knb.ecoinformatics.org:443/knb/metacat/nceas.976.1/nceas)
General Information:
Title:Demographic data of Cynoglussum officinale at 3 sites in the native and introduced ranges from 2004 - 2007
Identifier:nceas.976
Abstract:
This dataset contains demographic data for Cynoglossum officinale L. (Boraginaceae) collected at 3 sites in its native range and 3 sites in the introduced range from 2004 to 2007 (sampled 2 times/year). These data were used to parameterize integral projection models to investigate differences in life history between the native and introduced range (Williams 2009) and to investigate the impacts of native specialist insects and small-scale disturbances on population growth (Williams et al. 2010). Individual fate and size data of marked and mapped individuals in 1 m x 10 m transects were collected at 2 censuses per year (spring and summer), seed production was measured during the summer census; new seedlings were added each spring. These are all the data required to parameterize a population model (matrix model or integral projection model). This dataset includes 3 tables: 1) location of individual (to the nearest decimeter); 2) fate, size and amount of leaf herbivory at each census; 3) seedling fate in each transect (the fate of individuals was not followed). References: Williams, J. L. 2009. Flowering life-history strategies differ between the native and introduced ranges of a monocarpic perennial. American Naturalist 174:660-672; Williams, J. L., H. Auge, and J. L. Maron. 2010. Impacts of herbivore escape and disturbance on exotic plant success. Ecology 91:1355-1366.
Keywords:None:
  • demography
  • native and introduced ranges
  • Cynoglossum officinale
  • life history evolution
GCMD:
  • invasive species
  • Population dynamics
Publication Date:2011-10-11

Involved Parties

Data Set Creators:
Organization:NCEAS 12360: Williams: Evaluating life history theory and the consequences of reproductive strategy for population fluctuations
Organization:National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis
Individual: Jennifer Williams
Organization:NCEAS
Address:
NCEAS, 735 State Street, Suite 300,
Santa Barbara, California 93101 USA
Phone:
805 882 9218
Email Address:
jwilliams@nceas.ucsb.edu
Data Set Contacts:
Individual: Jennifer Williams
Organization:NCEAS
Address:
NCEAS, 735 State Street, Suite 300,
Santa Barbara, California 93101 USA
Phone:
805 882 9218
Email Address:
jwilliams@nceas.ucsb.edu
Associated Parties:
Individual: Jennifer Williams
Metadata Providers:
Individual: Jennifer Williams

Data Set Characteristics

Geographic Region:
Geographic Description:Data were collected at 3 field sites in the native range (in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, near Halle) and at 3 field sites in the introduced range (in western Montana, USA, near Missoula). For more details on individual sites, dominant species and precipitation during the study period, see Appendices of Williams et al. 2010 (available at Ecological Archives: http://esapubs.org/archive/ecol/E091/094/default.htm)
Bounding Coordinates:
West:  -114.0667  degrees
East:  11.6833  degrees
North:  46.9667  degrees
South:  51.4667  degrees
Time Period:
Begin:
2004-04-01
End:
2007-08-01
Taxonomic Range:
General Coverage:Cynoglossum officinale L. (Boraginaceae)
Classification:
Rank Name:Species
Rank Value:Cynoglossum officinale

Sampling, Processing and Quality Control Methods

Step by Step Procedures
Step 1:  
Description:

Demographic data collection for Cynoglossum officinale

At each site, I followed the demographic fate of all individuals in two 1 � 10 m transects that included at least 100 plants. These transects were lengthened to include enough individuals in the native range, where densities were lower. New seedlings were marked in the spring (April in Germany, May in Montana) and uniquely tagged the following summer, when they were one-year olds. At each census, the size of all plants was recorded by counting the number of leaves and measuring the length of the longest leaf; in some years, the root crown diameter (diameter at the soil surface) was also measured. At the summer census (early July in Germany, late July in Montana), plants have set seed, and the number of seeds produced was estimated by counting the number of inflorescence branches, known as cymes (number of seeds = exp(1.882 + 1.229*(log(number of cymes)); R2 = 0.78, F1,297 = 1028.0, P < 0.001). Details on the transition from seed to seedling, as well as the longevity of seeds in the seedbank are reported elsewhere with mean parameter estimates for each site (Williams et al. 2010).

Sampling Area And Frequency:
Data were collected from 3 field sites in the native range (near Halle, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany): Site 1. Salziger See. (51 degrees 29�N; 011 degrees 44�E, elevation 111 m); Site 2. Hohenerxleben. (51 degrees 51�N; 011 degrees 38�E, elevation 73 m); Site 3. Aseleben. (51 degrees 28�N; 011 degrees 41�E, elevation 132 m), and from 3 sites in the introduced range (near Missoula, MT, USA): Site 4. Lavalle Creek. (46 degrees 58�N; 114 degrees 04�W, elevation 1212 m); Site 5. Ninemile Prairie. (46 degrees 57�N; 113 degrees 32�W, elevation 1101 m); Site 6. Lubrecht Experimental Forest. (46 degrees 52�N; 113 degrees 25�W, elevation 1640 m). In the published work, data from the summer censuses (July) were used, but here data from both spring (April/May) and summer censuses are included for the years 2004 - 2007. Size of plants was measured at both censuses, but seed production data were only collected during the summer census (after plants had set seed).
Sampling Description:
I selected three study populations located in the center of each range that occurred in broadly representative habitats, and that minimized climatic differences so that differences between ranges would not be obscured by large differences in climate. Thus, the study populations were not chosen randomly, but were selected such that gross habitat structure and climate would be similar at sites across continents.

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Metadata download: Ecological Metadata Language (EML) File