Data Set Citation:
When using this data, please cite the data package:
NCEAS 2162: Liebhold: Integrating the statistical modeling of spatial data in ecology , National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis , and Miriti M.
Spatial locations and size measurements of Ambrosia dumosa in Joshua Tree National Park.
connolly.205.4 (https://knb.ecoinformatics.org:443/knb/metacat/connolly.205.4/nceas)
General Information:
Title:Spatial locations and size measurements of Ambrosia dumosa in Joshua Tree National Park.
Identifier:connolly.205
Abstract:
This data set contains spatial locations and size measurements of Ambrosia dumosa plants sampled in a 1-ha plot in Joshua Tree National Park in 1984.
Keywords:
  • Ambrosia dumosa
  • desert plants
  • Joshua Tree National Park
  • spatial analysis
Data Table, Image, and Other Data Details:
Metadata download: Ecological Metadata Language (EML) File
Data Table:Ambrosia dumosa data ( View Metadata | Download File download)

Involved Parties

Data Set Creators:
Organization:NCEAS 2162: Liebhold: Integrating the statistical modeling of spatial data in ecology
Organization:National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis
Individual: Maria Miriti
Organization:Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, Ohio State University
Address:
318 W. 12th Avenue,
Room 270 Aronoff Laboratory,
Columbus, OH 43210 USA
Email Address:
miriti.1@osu.edu
Web Address:
http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~mmiriti/
Data Set Contacts:
Individual: Maria Miriti
Organization:Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, Ohio State University
Address:
318 W. 12th Avenue,
Room 270 Aronoff Laboratory,
Columbus, OH 43210 USA
Email Address:
miriti.1@osu.edu
Web Address:
http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~mmiriti/
Associated Parties:
Individual: Andrew Liebhold
Individual: Jessica Gurevitch

Data Set Characteristics

Geographic Region:
Geographic Description:Joshua Tree National Park, California
Bounding Coordinates:
West:  -115.7833  degrees
East:  -115.7833  degrees
North:  33.7667  degrees
South:  33.7667  degrees
Time Period:
Begin:
1984-03-15
End:
1984-04-08
Taxonomic Range:
Classification:
Rank Name:Genus
Rank Value:Ambrosia
Classification:
Rank Name:Species
Rank Value:dumosa

Sampling, Processing and Quality Control Methods

Step by Step Procedures
Step 1:  
Description:

Study site and species

The study site is located on a gently sloping alluvial formation (bajada) northwest of the Eagle Mountains in Joshua Tree National Park, 10 km from the transition of the Colorado Desert to the Mojave Desert (115°47' W, 33°46' N; elevation 1006 m; photo in Howe and Wright 1986). The bajada is almost free of topographic heterogeneity. The steepest slope parallels the bajada and is 4%. Soils averaged from nine sampling stations at a depth of 10 cm consist of sand (62.4%), gravel (29.8%), and clays (7.8%). Rainfall averaged 18.5 cm/yr at the Cottonwood Spring ranger station (2 km distance) from 1970-1984. The most conspicuous species within the study site are Ambrosia dumosa (60% of stems) and Larrea tridentata (3% of stems; Miriti et al. 1998).Ambrosia dumosa (Gray) Payne (Asteraceae), is a low, intricately branched, monoecious, drought-deciduous, perennial shrub, usually 20-60 cm high. This species is characteristic of well drained soils below 1061 m, but occasionally occurs up to 1667 m, and is associated with Creosote Bush Scrub (Munz 1974). Leaves are pinnatifid, mostly clustered, 5-20 mm long, ovate in shape, and have 1-3 short obtuse lobes. Flower and fruit production usually occur from March through May. The life span of A. dumosa has been described from 35-50 yr to >200 yr (Bowers et al. 1995). Most seedlings occur close to conspecific adults, but many also occur in open spaces (Wright and Howe 1987, McAuliffe 1988, Miriti et al. 1998). Plants were mapped between 15 March and 8 April 1984. Each individual was mapped to the nearest 0.25 m within a square hectare (100 x 100 m) which was divided into 5 x 5 m subplots. Each plant was marked with an aluminum tag, and was identified by its species, height, major and minor axes, reproductive status and its location on the 100 x 100 m grid. Individuals greater than or equal to 10 cm tall were mapped only in the first 750 m2, and individuals greater than or equal to 20 cm tall were mapped over the remainder of the hectare.

Step 2:  
Description:

Literature cited in methods

Bowers, J. E., R. H. Webb, and R. J. Rondeau. 1995. Longevity, recruitment and mortality of desert plants in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA. Journal of Vegetation Science 6: 551-564. Howe, H. F., and S. J. Wright. 1986. Spatial pattern and mortality in the desert mallow (Sphaeralcea ambigua). National Geographic Research 2: 491-499. McAuliffe, J. R. 1988. Markovian dynamics of simple and complex desert plant communities. American Naturalist 131: 459–490. Miriti, M. N., H. F. Howe, and S. J. Wright. 1998. Spatial patterns of mortality in a Colorado Desert plant community. Plant Ecology 136: 41–51. Munz, P. A. 1974. A flora of southern California. University of California Press, Berkeley, California, USA. Wright, S. J., and H. F. Howe. 1987. Pattern and mortality in Colorado Desert plants. Oecologia (Berlin) 73: 543-552.

Data Set Usage Rights

Access Control:
Auth System:knb
Order:denyFirst
Metadata download: Ecological Metadata Language (EML) File